[#NEWBOOKALERT]: February Black Book Releases

Here’s a list of black books released this month. The books featured on this list, span across the genres of Urban Fiction, African-American Fiction/Non-Fiction and Books by Black Celebs.

Keep scrolling to see our list of black books released in February.

The Hearts We Burn by Briana Cole

Kimera Davis thought she was finally free from marrying-for-money—and living way too many lies. Until her obsessed ex-husband ignited the ultimate dark hoax, a spectacularly malicious deception that’s left her family, and her best friend, Adria, reeling. Now Kimera and her young son are prisoners at a remote estate, under the thumb of her ex’s powerful father. And she has only one slender chance of escape.
 
Suddenly Kimera is getting dangerously close to an unlikely ally, but even she can’t be sure if she’s playing him, if what they have is real . . . or if he’s mastering her game.  And there’s no guarantee that her calculations and wild-card moves will earn her and her son’s freedom—or cost more than her survival is worth . . . Read more here.

The Double Cross by Anna J

Two is company, but three is definitely a crowd, especially when we all want the same man. Who does a man love more: the woman he lies to or the woman he feeds the truth?

In the game of love and war, it’s so easy to get sidetracked when you’re the most sought after guy in your city, but for Chase Warren, he wants more. Bedding chicks is light work for him, but finding a forever queen proves to be a little more challenging. That is, until he lays eyes on Selah. She has everything he’s looking for and more, but one mistake could cost him everything. Will Chase tell Selah the truth to save his relationship, or will he slip up before he gets the chance to save face? Men will be men, but with a woman like Selah, being reckless comes with consequences that could truly be the end of him. Read more here.

10th Anniversary Edition Moth to a Flame by Ashley Antoinette

In the little city of Flint, MI, the good die young and the people left standing are the grimiest of characters. With reign over the city’s drug trade, Benjamin Atkins made sure that his precious daughter, Raven, was secluded from the grit that the city had to offer. But when Raven’s young heart gets claimed by Mizan, a stick-up kid in search of a come-up, there’s nothing Benjamin can do about losing her to the streets.  She chooses love over loyalty and runs off with Mizan, but her new role as wifey soon proves to be more than she can handle.

Puppy love always feels right, but things turn stale, and she soon finds that everyone she loves has disappeared. All she has is Mizan, but when hugs and kisses turn to bloody lips and black eyes, she realizes that Mizan is not who she thought he was.

Raven becomes desperate for a way out, but this time, Daddy can’t save her. Every time she finds the courage to leave, fear convinces her to stay. Like a moth to a flame, Raven is drawn to Mizan, even though she knows he’ll be the death of her.  When the hood life she chose becomes unbearable and the only way out is in a coffin, what will she do? Read more here.

Alicia: A Dark and Twisted Fairy Tale by Allison Hobbs

It’s hard to study for college finals when you’re heart has just been broken via a text message, but with a little help from some good ganja, Alicia Maxwell tries her best to focus. But her studies are interrupted when she sees a blur of white fur that leads her down a rabbit hole and to a wonderland where nothing seems to make sense. Initially she’s desperate to find her way back home, but becomes intrigued when she meets Ibrahim, a mysterious and fiercely handsome man with treacherous enemies—namely the evil queen, Vonetta and her ruthless army. Her mind tells her she should flee this strange and violent land, but after enjoying a night of hedonistic pleasure with the sensuous mystery man, she’s hooked and couldn’t leave Ibrahim if she tried. She tells herself that she only needs one more night of red hot passion before she returns to her boring life, and she eagerly accompanies Ibrahim on a journey that’s both dangerous and enchanting. Will Alicia find her way out of wonderland or is she trapped forever in a land where magic, mayhem, and debauchery is as normal as the air she breathes? Read more here.

Black Sunday by Tola Rotimi Abraham

Twin sisters Bibike and Ariyike are enjoying a relatively comfortable life in Lagos in 1996. Then their mother loses her job due to political strife, and the family, facing poverty, becomes drawn into the New Church, an institution led by a charismatic pastor who is not shy about worshipping earthly wealth.

Soon Bibike and Ariyike’s father wagers the family home on a “sure bet” that evaporates like smoke. As their parents’ marriage collapses in the aftermath of this gamble, the twin sisters and their two younger siblings, Andrew and Peter, are thrust into the reluctant care of their traditional Yoruba grandmother. Inseparable while they had their parents to care for them, the twins’ paths diverge once the household shatters. Each girl is left to locate, guard, and hone her own fragile source of power. Read more here.

Trouble is What I Do by Walter Mosley

Leonid McGill’s spent a lifetime building up his reputation in the New York investigative scene. His seemingly infallible instinct and inside knowledge of the crime world make him the ideal man to help when Phillip Worry comes knocking.
Phillip “Catfish” Worry is a 92-year-old Mississippi bluesman who needs Leonid’s help with a simple task: deliver a letter revealing the black lineage of a wealthy heiress and her corrupt father.

Unsurprisingly, the opportunity to do a simple favor while shocking the prevailing elite is too much for Leonid to resist. But when a famed and feared assassin puts a hit on Catfish, Leonid has no choice but to confront the ghost of his own felonious past. Working to protect his client and his own family, Leonid must reach the heiress on the eve of her wedding before her powerful father kills those who hold their family’s secret.

Joined by a team of young and tough aspiring investigators, Leonid must gain the trust of wary socialites, outsmart vengeful thugs, and, above all, serve the truth — no matter the cost. Read more here.

Meals, Music, and Musings: Recipes from my African-American Kitchen by Alexander Smalls & Veronica Chambers

Iconic chef and world-renowned opera singer Alexander Smalls marries two of his greatest passions―food and music―in Meals, Music, and Muses. More than just a cookbook, Smalls takes readers on a delicious journey through the South to examine the food that has shaped the region. Each chapter is named for a type of music to help readers understand the spirit that animates these recipes.

Filled with classic Southern recipes and twists on old favorites, this cookbook includes starters such as Hoppin’ John Cakes with Sweet Pepper Remoulade and Carolina Bourbon Barbecue Shrimp and Okra Skewers, and main dishes like Roast Quail in Bourbon Cream Sauce and Prime Rib Roast with Crawfish Onion Gravy.

Complete with anecdotes of Smalls’s childhood in the Low Country and examinations of Southern musical tradition, Meals, Music, and Muses is a heritage cookbook in the tradition of Edna Lewis’s A Taste of Country Cooking. Read more here.

Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot by Mikki Kendall

Today’s feminist movement has a glaring blind spot, and paradoxically, it is women. Mainstream feminists rarely talk about meeting basic needs as a feminist issue, argues Mikki Kendall, but food insecurity, access to quality education, safe neighborhoods, a living wage, and medical care are all feminist issues. All too often, however, the focus is not on basic survival for the many, but on increasing privilege for the few. That feminists refuse to prioritize these issues has only exacerbated the age-old problem of both internecine discord and women who rebuff at carrying the title. Moreover, prominent white feminists broadly suffer from their own myopia with regard to how things like race, class, sexual orientation, and ability intersect with gender. How can we stand in solidarity as a movement, Kendall asks, when there is the distinct likelihood that some women are oppressing others?

In her searing collection of essays, Mikki Kendall takes aim at the legitimacy of the modern feminist movement arguing that it has chronically failed to address the needs of all but a few women. Drawing on her own experiences with hunger, violence, and hypersexualization, along with incisive commentary on politics, pop culture, the stigma of mental health, and more, Hood Feminism delivers an irrefutable indictment of a movement in flux. An unforgettable debut, Kendall has written a ferocious clarion call to all would-be feminists to live out the true mandate of the movement in thought and in deed. Read more here.

Vegetable Kingdom: The Abundant World of Vegan Recipes by Bryant Terry

Food justice activist and author Bryant Terry breaks down the fundamentals of plant-based cooking in Vegetable Kingdom, showing you how to make delicious meals from popular vegetables, grains, and legumes. Recipes like Dirty Cauliflower, Barbecued Carrots with Slow-Cooked White Beans, Millet Roux Mushroom Gumbo, and Citrus & Garlic-Herb-Braised Fennel are enticing enough without meat substitutes, instead relying on fresh ingredients, vibrant spices, and clever techniques to build flavor and texture. 

The book is organized by ingredient, making it easy to create simple dishes or showstopping meals based on what’s fresh at the market. Bryant also covers the basics of vegan cooking, explaining the fundamentals of assembling flavorful salads, cooking filling soups and stews, and making tasty grains and legumes. With beautiful imagery and classic design, Vegetable Kingdom is an invaluable tool for plant-based cooking today. Read more here.

Be sure to read all the great books released by black authors this month. Get your copy of these books and more on our Urban Bookish Amazon page!

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